Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://www.repositorio.ufc.br/handle/riufc/29784
Title in Portuguese: From the perception of a cluster of cases of children with microcephaly to congenital Zika syndrome in Brazil: the lessons we have learned and the challenges that lie ahead of us
Author: Ribeiro, Erlane Marques
Lopes, Thayse Figueiredo
Kerbage, Sáile Cavalcante
Pessoa, André Luis Santos
Cavalcanti, Luciano Pamplona de Góes
Keywords: Microcefalia
Microcephaly
Zika virus
Issue Date: Mar-2017
Publisher: The Journal of Venomous Animals and Toxins Including Tropical Diseases
Citation: RIBEIRO, E. M. et al. From the perception of a cluster of cases of children with microcephaly to congenital Zika syndrome in Brazil: the lessons we have learned and the challenges that lie ahead of us. The Journal of Venomous Animals and Toxins Including Tropical Diseases, v. 23, p. 1-3, mar. 2017.
Abstract: A little more than a year ago, physicians and researchers from the northeastern region of Brazil raised the hypothesis of an association between microcephaly cases in newborns and a possible Zika virus infection in their mothers during pregnancy. Common phenotypic features called the attention of the discerning eyes of geneticists, already used to this type of observation [1]. In those cases, records of exanthematous disease during pregnancy were found in the anamnesis. Moreover, radiology images revealed findings that although resembled some other TORCH, they had their particularities in common. Initially, a recurrent pattern in computerized tomography of the skulls was described, which led physicians to classify the set of findings as the emergence of a new disease [2]. For professionals who were experiencing this reality in the Northeast, there was no doubt that the puzzle was being solved. Chronology, clinical history and findings, all of these suggested that the exanthematous disease reported by those women during pregnancy was related to the microcephaly of their babies [3]. Although there was a strong distrust concerning causal relationship and at that time no scientific basis to corroborate the hypothesis, for many physicians Zika virus was underestimated, an apparently self-limited disease with discrete symptoms that people often overlooked.
URI: http://www.repositorio.ufc.br/handle/riufc/29784
metadata.dc.type: Artigo de Periódico
ISSN: 1678-9199 (On line)
Appears in Collections:DPML - Artigos publicados em revista científica

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